Tag Archives: Patrick Chung

Patriots Advance — Again

With Jacksonville’s victory last Sunday, the NFL’s final four this year include three Cinderella teams.  The Jaguars were 3-13 last year – their sixth consecutive losing season.  This team hadn’t made the playoffs since 2007 and has never played in a Super Bowl.

The two teams that will battle it out for the NFC crown have also never won Super Bowls, although both the Minnesota Vikings and the Philadelphia Eagles have at least made it that far (the Vikings are 0-4 in the big game, the Eagles 0-2).  Those two teams have made it to the verge of the Super Bowl behind backup quarterbacks who have been lightly regarded and largely given up on.

The fourth team is the shark in the tank.  While this season of upheaval has seen most of the old guard falling by the wayside, even this monumental shift in the balance of power can’t unseat the New England Patriots.  Sunday, they will play in their seventh consecutive conference championship game.

Same Old Patriots?

The 2017-18 version of the Patriots are an intriguing blend of the expected and the mostly un-suspected.

On the expected side is quarterback Tom Brady, tight end Rob Gronkowski and a prolific offense.  In last Saturday’s 35-14 elimination of Tennessee (gamebook), the Titans thought to take the big play out of the Patriot arsenal and force them to drive the length of the field five yards at a time.  To a degree, they succeeded.  Of New England’s 80 offensive plays, only four gained 20 or more yards – and only one of those gained more than thirty.

The fly in the ointment, of course, is that the Patriots exhibited no trouble at all grinding up and down the field.  New England put together two drives that lasted more than five minutes – both consisting of 15 or more plays. Four times they scored touchdowns on drives that exceeded 50 yards (two of those traveling 90 yards or more).  They converted 6 of 9 third downs in the first half, and followed that by converting 5 of 8 in the second half.  That first half featured Brady throwing 7 times to the exceedingly quick Danny Amendola.  Danny caught all 7 passes for 62 yards – none of them longer than 15 yards.

New England scored touchdowns in all five red zone possessions.

Relentless, precise, methodical – everyone who faces the Patriots understands that they will have to find some way of coping with this elite offense.

Don’t Overlook the New England Defense

Less recognized are the week-in, week-out contributions of the Patriot defensive unit.  As opposed to the offense, there are no splash players here.  No one from the Patriot defense was named to the Pro Bowl – even as replacements for injured players (by comparison, three members of the offense and one from the Patriot special teams were named).  But as the 2017 season reaches its critical juncture, the Patriot defense is playing as well as any unit still playing – especially against the run.

In one of the most impressive displays of Wildcard weekend, The Tennessee Titans brutalized the Kansas City Chiefs with their running game (that game is discussed in some detail here).  With battering ram running back Derrick Henry pounding the center of the KC defense and quarterback Marcus Mariota sprinting around the ends, Tennessee amassed 202 rushing yards – 156 of them from Henry.

This ground dominance ended abruptly in New England.  Henry finished the game with 28 yards on 12 carries (a 2.3 average) with no run exceeding four yards.  Tennessee finished with just 65 rushing yards for the evening.

Brown and Flowers

At the center of the impenetrable defense was nose tackle Malcom Brown.  Listed at 6-2 and 319 pounds (modest measurements by NFL standards), Brown isn’t an imposing figure in the Vince Wilfork mold.  But the Patriots’ first-round pick in the 2015 draft has developed into an excellent technician in the middle.  All evening, he repeatedly got under the pads of Tennessee center Ben Jones (who was one of the heroes against KC).  Henry never had the middle of the field open for him as Jones was constantly being pushed back in his face.  Similarly, Trey Flowers – a rangy presence at defensive tackle/end – kept the Tennessee linemen that he faced in place, collapsing all of the running lanes.

Neither Brown nor Flowers are marquee names.  Flowers led the team with a modest total of 6.5 sacks.  But as the pieces have come together for the Patriots as they come down the stretch, Brown, Flowers and the rest of the role players in Bill Belichik’s (and Matt Patricia’s) defense commit to the inglorious work of taking on blocks, closing running lanes, and making sure tackles.

They were great.  But if I were to pick two running plays to illustrate what has made this New England run defense so tough, it would be the two times that Henry tried to get around the end.

Big Stops

There is 4:31 left in the first quarter, with the game still scoreless.  Tennessee faces first-and-ten on New England’s 45-yard line.  Mariota tosses to Henry, trying to race around left end.

Charged with sealing the edge is tight end Delanie Walker, but Flowers is having none of it.  He rides Walker right down the line, stringing out the sweep.  Wide receivers Eric Decker and Corey Davis were charged with clearing out defensive backs Devin McCourty and Malcolm Butler. Both failed, leaving both defensive backs free to meet Henry as he tried to turn the corner.  But most impressive on this play was safety/linebacker Patrick Chung.

The play called for much decorated tackle Taylor Lewan to peel away from the formation and head downfield to throw a key block against a smaller defensive back.  Chung never gave him the chance.

Listed at just 5-11 and 207 pounds, Chung would seem to be the kind of smaller back that Lewan would gobble up.  But Chung diagnosed the intent of the play immediately and flew into Lewan at top speed before he could get untracked, further stripping away Henry’s blocking on the play.   Derrick managed to pick-up three yards before McCourty and Butler halted his progress.

Chung Strikes Again

Now there is only 25 seconds left in the first half.  By this time the Patriots had opened up a 21-7 lead. The Titans sat on the Patriot 46-yard line, but faced a fourth-and-one.  Their decision to go for it would prove to be one of the turning points of the game.

Again Derrick Henry would test the left edge.  This time Decker lined up across from defensive end Kyle Van Noy, but lost that confrontation immediately.  At the snap, Van Noy pushed through Decker deep into the Titans’ backfield, allowing first Butler and finally Stephon Gilmore un-abated access to the ball carrier.  Tight end Jonnu Smith lined up just behind the tackle on that side, positioned where they thought he could double-team Van Noy.  But Kyle was through Decker before Jonnu could arrive.

But the compelling thing about this play was that it wasn’t designed to go around the end.

Supposing that Decker and Smith could push Van Noy wide, and that tight end Luke Stocker could seal Flowers inside, the Titans thought they could open a crease just off tackle.  Figuring that a defensive back would flow down to fill the gap, Tennessee pulled guard Josh Kline and sent him through the hole first to clean it out.  But Kline met with the same fate that Lewan had a quarter earlier.

Flying in at top speed, Patrick Chung met Kline in the hole and closed it immediately, leaving Henry with no escape route.  Derrick and the Titans lost five yards on the play.

Is Anyone Taking Notice?

Taking 300-pound linemen head on isn’t usually in the job description of 200-pound defensive backs.  Rare is the defensive back who will even try to take on a lineman.  Mostly, when they find themselves isolated against a lineman, you will see the defensive back try to find some way to slip around them.  Chung is a rare article.  He’s a defensive back who takes on linemen – and wins.

From a statistical standpoint, Chung probably ranks in the lowest tier of defensive backs.  He intercepted just one pass during the season, and never recorded a sack.  But Chung, I think, has quietly become the soul of this defense.  To a not-inconsiderable degree, the rest of the Patriot defense feeds off his fearlessness.  Chung, Brown and Flowers are the leaders of a workman-like defense – a defense that adheres to Belichick’s motto of “do your job” even when the job is less than glamourous.  Running the ball consistently against this defense will be a challenge.

Why Run Defense Matters

And this is a more significant development than many fans realize.  All of the other teams left standing are heavily run-dependent on offense.  In Blake Bortles, Nick Foles and Case Keenum, none of the other teams has a quarterback they can send out there with the mandate to win the game.  If Jacksonville finishes with 65 rushing yards on Sunday, they will lose the game.  The emergence of the Patriot run defense is a huge deal, indeed.

The other pressure weighing on opposing running games is the New England offense.  Trailing 21-7 at the half, the Titans closed down their running game.  Henry took one handoff (a 4-yard dive up the middle) after halftime.  Toss in a scramble from Mariota, and the Tennessee running game accounted for 10 second half yards on two attempts.  There is a significant onus on Jacksonville’s defense to keep the score close enough Sunday for the Jaguars to keep running the ball.

That matchup – for the right to represent the AFC in the Super Bowl – has suddenly gained several new layers of intrigue as injuries to Tom Brady’s wrist and thumb have been in all the headlines.  If the Patriots are forced to compete without Brady – or perhaps with a compromised Brady – it will significantly improve Jacksonville’s chances.

And ratchet up the pressure on the New England defense.

New England Patriots on the Verge of Another Title

It was already going to be an uphill climb.

With 13:21 left in the game, the Pittsburgh Steelers trailed the New England Patriots 33-9.  Now they sat third-and-goal on the Patriot 2-yard line.  A touchdown and a 2-point conversion could make it a 16-point game with 13 minutes to play, allowing a glimmer of hope for the Steelers.

In the shotgun, Pittsburgh quarterback Ben Roethlisberger took the snap and surveyed the field.  His line – which held up tremendously against the Patriot rush all evening – was at its best on this play.

Trying to get around Steeler left tackle Alejandro Villanueva, Patriot defensive end Trey Flowers tumbled to the turf and laid there for about three seconds until he realized that Roethlisberger had still not thrown the ball – at which point he scrambled back to his feet and re-joined the rush.

Next to him, defensive tackle Alan Branch – whose contribution to this game was enormous – was tangled up with center Maurkice Pouncey and right guard David DeCastro.  After pushing into them for several seconds, Alan looked behind him to see where the pass had gone, only to realize that Ben hadn’t thrown it yet.

After six full seconds – an eternity by NFL standards – receiver Cobi Hamilton broke clear over the middle.  Roethlisberger delivered a strike and for a brief moment, the Steelers had a glimmer of life.

And in that same moment, yellow flags littered the field.  Hamilton – in his efforts to elude cornerback Eric Rowe – had stepped out of the back of the end zone and had become an ineligible receiver.  Knowing this was the case, Rowe dropped his pursuit, allowing Hamilton to uncover and encouraging Roethlisberger’s throw.

Now it was fourth and goal from the two.  Realizing that a field goal helped them not at all at this point, Pittsburgh lined up to go for it.  Again the target was Hamilton as he curled into the right flat, pursued this time by Logan Ryan.  Roethlisberger lofted the pass over Logan’s head, and Hamilton – spinning back for the ball in the end zone, actually felt the ball rest for a split second on his fingertips when Ryan reached a hand in and knocked the pass away before Cobi could bring it down.

If any two plays could serve as a microcosm of this game, it would be these two.  Throughout the contest – and in spite of the terrific athleticism of the Steelers – the Patriots were always just a little quicker and a little smarter as they punched their ticket to Super Bowl LI with a steady 36-17 victory.

Moreover, this was the second time that this game had pivoted on a critical goal line stand.

When the Game Got Away From Pittsburgh

The series of events which spelled the Steelers’ doom began with ten minutes left in the second period.  Pittsburgh had just capped a 13-play, 84-yard drive with a 5-yard touchdown run that cut New England’s lead to 10-6.  Now, with 10:06 left before the half, the Patriots faced a third-and-ten from their own 30.  One play away from giving the ball back to the aroused Pittsburgh offense, Patriot quarterback Tom Brady sat easily in his pocket (as the Steelers only sent three pass rushers after him), and found Julian Edelman all alone over the middle of Pittsburgh’s very soft zone for 12 yards and a first down.

Two plays later, New England was in third down again – third and eight – from its own 42.  Once again, Pittsburgh’s loose zone coverage left receiver Chris Hogan uncovered in the left flat.  He took Brady’s soft pass and raced down to the Steeler 34-yard line for a 22-yard gain.

Having had two chances to get off the field, Pittsburgh’s defense would not get a third.  On first-and-ten from the Pittsburgh 34, Brady handed the ball to running back Dion Lewis who ran with it almost to the line of scrimmage.  There he stopped and flipped the ball back to Brady, who finished the perfectly executed ‘flea-flicker’ with a touchdown toss to Hogan.  Now the Patriots led 17-6.

Back came the Steelers.  Two dump passes to DeAngelo Williams gained 18 yards and gave the Steelers a first down on their own 48.  Roethlisberger converted a third-and-two with a 12-yard pass to Antonio Brown, and followed that up with an 11-yard completion to tight end Jesse James.  First down at the Patriot 21.

On first down, Hamilton ran a streak up the left side and gained just a sliver of separation from Rowe, but Roethlisberger’s well-thrown back-shoulder pass bounced off Cobi’s chest.  This missed opportunity would soon be overshadowed by an even greater missed opportunity.  A 2-yard run by Williams brought Pittsburgh to third-and-eight from the New England 19-yard line at the two-minute warning.

Pittsburgh converted the third down as James beat safety Patrick Chung up the right sideline and Roethlisberger threw him the ball at about the 11-yard line with plenty of open space before him.  Converging on James as he reached the Patriot goal line were Chung and safety Duron Harmon.  Seemingly, they didn’t get there in time as James tumbled over the goal line.  The official’s arms raised.  The Pittsburgh sideline celebrated.  The points went on the scoreboard – it was now a 17-12 game with the Steelers contemplating a two-point try.

And then they checked the replay.

Harmon, somehow, had managed to drive James to the ground one-half yard away from the touchdown.  So it wasn’t 17-12 yet.  And, as it turned out, it never would be.

Two running plays lost four yards.  On the second running play, the Steelers had right guard DeCastro pulling – always dangerous on the goal line.  Patriot defensive lineman Vincent Valentine knifed through the void in the line and dumped Williams in the backfield.  Roethlisberger’s third-down throw to Eli Rogers was well wide, and the Steelers kicked the field goal.

Pittsburgh’s first four “red zone” plays netted 18 yards and a touchdown.  Pittsburgh’s fifth red zone play accounted for another 18 yards (the pass to James).  In Pittsburgh’s last seven red zone plays of the season, they netted just seven yards and missed two opportunities that would have changed the complexion of the game.

All in a day’s work for the New England defense.

New England’s Defense

In Foxborough, Massachusetts, everyone lives and works in Tom Brady’s shadow.  One of the most decorated quarterbacks in history, Brady has been the starter in New England for 15 full seasons, now.  Those teams have missed the playoffs only once, while Brady is less than twenty-four hours away from perhaps his fifth Super Bowl title.  He is the focus of the football universe.

But in 2016 – flying almost completely under the national radar – New England assembled an exceptional defensive unit that is as responsible as the offense for leading Patriots into the Super Bowl.  This defense will be one of the critical elements in their upcoming victory.  Unlike Atlanta or Green Bay there are no Vic Beasley’s or Clay Matthews’ or any name superstar.  No one from the Patriots was among the league leaders in sacks or interceptions.  Unlike the offense, there is no center of media attention.  Yet the Patriots (who during the season surrendered the fewest point of any defense in football) mostly dominated one of football’s best offenses (Pittsburgh came into the game ranked seventh in total yards and fifth in passing yards).  They did so in a manner that is wholly unique to the Patriots.  Instead of a collection of compelling talents, Bill Belichick and his staff has composed an army of specialists who simply do their job.

What defensive lineman Alan Branch does for a living is not remotely glamorous.  He is an unlikely candidate to appear on the cover of GQ magazine.  He doesn’t hold a fistful of records or gaudy sack totals.  It’s entirely doubtful that the cover of the next issue of Sports Illustrated will feature a glossy photo of Alan with his cleats dug into the Gillette Stadium turf fending off the charge of two enormous offensive linemen.  Yet that is how he spent most of the evening.

One week after the elite offensive line of the Steelers carved up the Kansas City Chiefs to the tune of 171 rushing yards, Pittsburgh was limited to just 54 in New England as Branch and his defensive line mates Trey Flowers, Malcom Brown and Jabaal Sheard relentlessly and unceremoniously hurled themselves at that offensive line.  Where as the week before, that line had repeatedly pushed the Kansas City defensive line back into its own secondary, this week nearly every Pittsburgh running play more closely resembled a rugby scrum where the line of scrimmage was littered with the bodies of fallen linemen, allowing the linebackers unfettered access to the ball carriers.

Behind the unyielding defensive line roams a linebacking corps that resembles a collection of Swiss army knives.  Rob Ninkovich, Shea McClellin, Kyle Van Noy, Dont’a Hightower and Elandon Roberts do a little bit of everything.  The rush the passer, they play tight pass coverage – especially in man schemes, and they tackle.  Oh yes, they tackle.  When the Patriot linebackers arrive on the scene, the progress of the ball carrier halts.  Over the years, the Patriots have earned the reputation as the most fundamentally sound team in football.  One needs look no further than this collection of linebackers to validate this reputation.

An honorary membership in this group needs to be extended to safety Patrick Chung.  Listed generously at 5-11 and 207 pounds, Chung doesn’t at all fit the physical profile of a linebacker.  But he is almost always within 7 or so yards of the line of scrimmage.  A lot of the defensive backs in the league will do what they can to let some of the bigger defenders stop the running games.  Patrick Chung lives to mix it up with the big boys.  Sometimes you will even see him lineup in between the big defensive linemen on the line of scrimmage.

The backbone of this impressive defense is a secondary that gets more impressive every time I watch them – especially cornerbacks Malcolm Butler, Logan Ryan and Eric Rowe.  Their efforts in man coverage against the very talented Pittsburgh receivers was more than a little stunning.

At the end of the day, Roethlisberger and his receiving crew ended up just 9 of 23 (39.1%) when throwing against New England when they were in man coverage.  Antonio Brown – one of football’s elite offensive talents – ended his night with just 7 catches for 77 yards.  For the season, Antonio caught 106 passes for 1284 yards.  His first two playoff games saw him collect 5 passes for 124 yards and 2 touchdowns against Miami, and 6 passes for 108 yards against Kansas City.

Against the New England man coverage scheme – which was basically Butler with safety help over top – Brown was only targeted 4 times.  He finished with 2 catches for 22 yards.

Let’s let that sink in a bit.  Four targets, two catches, twenty-two yards.  What was the unimaginably clever defensive scheme that the Patriots used to foil Pittsburgh’s most dangerous weapon?  Press man coverage from Butler with safety help over the top.  As defensive schemes go, this is hardly the theory of relativity.  What made it work was simple execution.  In the do-your-job universe of Bill Belichick, if your job is to cover Jones, then you cover Jones.  No other activity during the play will distract you from your job.  Patriot defensive backs do not get caught looking into the offensive backfield when they are in man coverage.  The expression of this philosophy is appallingly simple.  Its execution is something most teams consistently fail at.

Super Bowl Prediction

There is an assumption by many that the New England defense will be as helpless against Atlanta’s great wide receiver Julio Jones as every other defense has been.  I beg to differ.

As I play through the game in my mind, I see the Patriot offense probing the young Falcon defense until it settles on one of the weaknesses to exploit – it could be Atlanta’s issues in stopping the running game or its difficulty covering tight end Martellus Bennett in man coverage.  After the number that Brady did on the Steeler zone defenses, I doubt that we’ll see Atlanta play much zone against them.  They are not terribly good at zone defense, anyway.  Probably they will try to pressure Brady up the middle.  My guess is that we will see much more blitzing from Atlanta than we did from Pittsburgh.  The pressure will give the Falcons their best chance at slowing the Patriot offense.  But blitzing Brady comes with its own set of risks.  The Steelers only blitzed him six times and Brady was 6-for-6 for 117 yards and a touchdown when they did.

Anyway, it’s difficult to imagine that Atlanta will hold the Patriot offense to fewer than, say, 33 points.  This places the onus squarely on the Falcon offense to match the Patriots touchdown for touchdown.

When I reflect on how unimpressive Atlanta’s offensive line was against Green Bay and how dominant New England’s defensive line was against Pittsburgh’s much better offensive line, I have a hard time imagining that Atlanta will be able to establish any kind of running game.  This will force Matt Ryan to win the game through the air – throwing against this very skilled man coverage defense.

Will New England shut out the Patriots or eliminate Julio Jones entirely from the mix?  Almost assuredly not.  Ryan is an elite quarterback and Jones is probably the best wide receiver in football.

But will a one-dimensional Falcon offense (even if that one dimension is Ryan-to-Jones) be enough to win a point fest against the Patriots?  I’m going to have to say no.

After a season of turmoil, we are a few hours away now from its concluding game.  The Atlanta Falcons have grown up very quickly. They have now moved themselves into the upper echelon the NFL.  But – it says here – they are not yet a match for the Patriots.  But then again, who is?

The NFL Gamebook for the New England-Pittsburgh contest is here, and the Pro Football Reference Summary can be found here.