Tag Archives: Pittsburgh Steelers

Introducing the New Jacksonville Jaguars

As I was watching the game, I tried to remember the last time I watched Jacksonville play.  It may actually have been their last playoff game following the 2007 season.  Surely, I must have caught one of their games in the last decade?

Anyway, if – like me – the Jacksonville Jaguars have flown beneath your radar for the last few years, you should know that things are a bit different there these days.

First of all, there is a newish head coach.  Jack Del Rio hasn’t been here since 2011.  The head coach during most of the lost years between was Gus Bradley.  In four almost complete seasons (2013-2016) his teams never won more than 5 games.  The team is now entrusted to Doug Marrone, who started to turn Buffalo around a few seasons ago.

The defense has been refurbished.  Last year’s first-round draft pick – cornerback Jalen Ramsey – has given Jacksonville an attitude in the secondary.  He has been complimented this year by the additions of cornerback A.J. Bouye (who was an important part of Houston’s very good secondary last year), safety Barry Church (who came over from Dallas), and defensive end Calais Campbell (who was in Arizona last year).

And now, all of a sudden, there is a semi-legitimacy to the Jaguar defense (semi-legitimate because they allowed 569 rushing yards over the three consecutive games before Sunday).

The offensive concept is kind of new, too.  Less passing from quarterback Blake Bortles and more handing off to this year’s first-round draft pick, running back Leonard Fournette.  At 240 pounds (listed) Fournette is constructed along the lines of the power backs of old – the kind that wears away at the will of the defensive secondary to tackle him in the fourth quarter.

The re-birth in Jacksonville has been somewhat hit and miss so far.  They have losses to teams that you should think they would have beaten (Tennessee and the NY Jets).  They’ve had one game where they turned the ball over 3 times – but that was the only game that they’ve turned it over more than once.  Only once have they gained more than 313 offensive yards, while serving up at least 371 yards on defense three times in their first five games.  So there is some work that still needs to be done there.

Last Sunday, they engaged in a very interesting matchup against a somewhat similar Pittsburgh team.  As the two teams hit the field Sunday afternoon, both featured high-octane running games and tough secondaries that challenge every pass.  Both also featured suspect run defenses.  The Jaguars had just been chewed up for 256 yards by the Jets (of all people).  The week before that Chicago (of all people) had drilled the Steelers for 222 rushing yards – although it should be noted that that was the only game so far that they had allowed more than 91 rushing yards.

The way this game was expected to play out, the two running games would take turns bashing each other’s defenses, until Steeler quarterback Ben Roethlisberger would take advantage of enough opportunities downfield to give Pittsburgh enough margin that Jacksonville would be forced into a passing game.  That story line never developed.

Instead, it was only Jacksonville that followed the expected game plan.  Of their 32 first-half offensive plays, 18 ended up being runs.  They gained only 3.3 yards per rush, but they kept running.  Meanwhile, Pittsburgh never did really get back to Le’Veon Bell, who carried the ball only 9 times in the first half.  Thinking that they could open up the running game with an early passing attack, Ben threw the ball 21 times in the first half, with mostly tepid results (12 of 21 for 152 yards and an interception).

The Steeler strategy further dissolved in the second half, when consecutive possessions ended in deflected passes that wound up as interception touchdowns for Jacksonville.  Suddenly, a game that was 7-6 at the half had turned into a 20-9 Jacksonville lead.  Things went downhill for Pittsburgh after that.  Bell finished the day with only 15 carries.  Ben ended up throwing 55 passes and getting 5 of them picked.

Meanwhile, Jacksonville kept running.  Fournette had 14 carries in the second half alone – the last one being the most memorable.  Leonard burst off left tackle for a game icing 90-yard touchdown run.  He finished with 181 of Jacksonville’s 231 rushing yards (on 37 attempts) in Jacksonville’s 30-9 conquest (gamebook).

Perhaps the most telling number to come out of that second half was 1.  That was the number of passes thrown by Jacksonville quarterback Bortles.  Once Jacksonville pushed to that 11-point lead, Blake never threw again – this includes hand-offs on a third-and-7 and a third-and-11.

There are, apparently, a lot of pieces in place in Jacksonville.  One piece, I guess, that they are still looking for is that quarterback.

Up next for the Jaguars is a very interesting game against another franchise that is trying to rise from the ashes – the now Los Angeles Rams.

Meanwhile, in Houston . . .

While the Jags are probably still looking for their quarterback of the future, Houston thinks they have found theirs.  Again.

Last year, that was going to be Brock Osweiler.  Two years before that it was Ryan Fitzpatrick.  Since about the midpoint of the 2013 season, when they finally figured out that Matt Schaub was not the man who would lead them to the promised land, they have cycled a lot of quarterbacks in and out of Houston.

The newest quarterback of the future is Deshaun Watson, the twelfth overall pick in this year’s draft.  Around him they have crafted a clever, deception-based offense.  I would guess that almost 40% of their offensive snaps Sunday night (at least until they were behind far enough that Kansas City knew they would have to drop back and pass) involved some end-around motion from a back or receiver circling back into the backfield.  This was sprinkled in with a significant amount of zone-read looks.

The effect on the Houston running game – at least on Sunday night – was significant.  Several times the backfield action proved just distracting enough to allow the Texans significant yards between guard and center.  For the evening, Houston piled up 144 rushing yards and averaged 6.3 yards per carry.

On the passing end, the numbers have been very kind to Watson.  Through the first 145 passes of his professional career, Deshaun carries a 100.7 passer rating.  This comes mostly through the virtue of his touchdown passes.  He tossed 5 Sunday night, and now has 9 over his last two games, and 11 over his last three.  It’s a very encouraging start, but Deshaun is far from a finished product.

His decision making – both in passing and in the read-option run game – was sometimes spotty.  He wasn’t intercepted on Sunday night, but that wasn’t through lack of opportunity.  Kansas City had a few should-have-been interceptions (two that would have been returned for touchdowns) that were dropped.  Understand, I’m not saying Deshaun performed poorly.  What I am pointing out is that the talented Mr. Watson is still a rookie quarterback, and there will be some growing pains along the way.

Speaking of Pain

On two of the most innocuous-looking plays of the season, during the game’s opening drive, two enormous presences in the Houston defense were deleted for the season.  On the game’s seventh play, and after a seemingly uneventful pass rush, dynamic linebacker Whitney Mercilus knelt on the turf.  Seemingly nothing major, Whitney suffered a torn pectoral muscle – ending his season.  Seven plays later, superstar J.J. Watt went down just a little awkwardly on another seemingly uneventful pass rush.  The result – a tibial plateau fracture that would require season-ending surgery.  Such is the thin, thin line between an outstanding season and another bad-luck finish.  Houston is a courageous team, led by a fine head coach in Bill O’Brien.  But they will be challenged to plug two larger-than-life holes in their defense.

Watt’s exit was possibly the most heavily covered of any in recent NFL memory.  The cameras followed every step of the way.  We saw JJ hobble to the sidelines.  We saw him going into and out of the medical tent.  Watched him limp into the locker room; saw the ambulance waiting grimly for him outside the locker room.  We had the haunting shot of JJ sitting inside the closed ambulance, his face framed perfectly through the back window by the emergency insignia of the ambulance door.  We even had drone coverage of the ambulance’s arrival at the nearest hospital.

Over-done?  I don’t think so.  In his few short seasons in the NFL, JJ has exceeded simple legendary status.  He is more than just the face of the franchise – not that that’s a small thing.  He is one of the faces of the league.  Even more than that, he is kind of a symbol for Houston itself – especially in the wake of the recent natural disasters in the area.  JJ Watt will leave a legend-sized hole in the Houston defense and in the entire NFL.

And Then There is Kansas City

While Houston was having one of its more heart-rending evenings of the young season, the Kansas City Chiefs kept on keeping on.  With their informative and entertaining 42-34 win (gamebook) the Chiefs are 5-0 and the last undefeated team in the NFL.

How will this play out?  They have looked unstoppable, but that kind of thing has been known to happen through the early weeks of a season.  Quarterback Alex Smith has been playing on a level that most didn’t believe that he had in him.  After 158 passes this season, Smith is completing 76.6% of them, averaging 8.80 yards per attempted pass, and he checks in with a convincing 125.8 quarterback rating that features a touchdown-to-interception ratio of 11-0.

Is he for real?  Are the Chiefs for real?  It’s too early, I think, to tell.  Their recent success – and the recent struggles of the Steelers (discussed above) sets up a very interesting contest this Sunday as Kansas City hosts Pittsburgh.  The Steelers are a proud franchise, not used to being picked on by the Jacksonville’s of the league, and they are bent on responding.  Pittsburgh is also the team that ended Kansas City’s playoff run last year, when they invaded Arrowhead last January and escaped with an 18-16 victory (gamebook).  In that game, Alex finished 20 of 34 for just 172 yards with 1 touchdown pass and one interception (a 69.7 rating).

Perhaps our understanding of both teams will be a bit clearer after next Sunday’s game.

New England Patriots on the Verge of Another Title

It was already going to be an uphill climb.

With 13:21 left in the game, the Pittsburgh Steelers trailed the New England Patriots 33-9.  Now they sat third-and-goal on the Patriot 2-yard line.  A touchdown and a 2-point conversion could make it a 16-point game with 13 minutes to play, allowing a glimmer of hope for the Steelers.

In the shotgun, Pittsburgh quarterback Ben Roethlisberger took the snap and surveyed the field.  His line – which held up tremendously against the Patriot rush all evening – was at its best on this play.

Trying to get around Steeler left tackle Alejandro Villanueva, Patriot defensive end Trey Flowers tumbled to the turf and laid there for about three seconds until he realized that Roethlisberger had still not thrown the ball – at which point he scrambled back to his feet and re-joined the rush.

Next to him, defensive tackle Alan Branch – whose contribution to this game was enormous – was tangled up with center Maurkice Pouncey and right guard David DeCastro.  After pushing into them for several seconds, Alan looked behind him to see where the pass had gone, only to realize that Ben hadn’t thrown it yet.

After six full seconds – an eternity by NFL standards – receiver Cobi Hamilton broke clear over the middle.  Roethlisberger delivered a strike and for a brief moment, the Steelers had a glimmer of life.

And in that same moment, yellow flags littered the field.  Hamilton – in his efforts to elude cornerback Eric Rowe – had stepped out of the back of the end zone and had become an ineligible receiver.  Knowing this was the case, Rowe dropped his pursuit, allowing Hamilton to uncover and encouraging Roethlisberger’s throw.

Now it was fourth and goal from the two.  Realizing that a field goal helped them not at all at this point, Pittsburgh lined up to go for it.  Again the target was Hamilton as he curled into the right flat, pursued this time by Logan Ryan.  Roethlisberger lofted the pass over Logan’s head, and Hamilton – spinning back for the ball in the end zone, actually felt the ball rest for a split second on his fingertips when Ryan reached a hand in and knocked the pass away before Cobi could bring it down.

If any two plays could serve as a microcosm of this game, it would be these two.  Throughout the contest – and in spite of the terrific athleticism of the Steelers – the Patriots were always just a little quicker and a little smarter as they punched their ticket to Super Bowl LI with a steady 36-17 victory.

Moreover, this was the second time that this game had pivoted on a critical goal line stand.

When the Game Got Away From Pittsburgh

The series of events which spelled the Steelers’ doom began with ten minutes left in the second period.  Pittsburgh had just capped a 13-play, 84-yard drive with a 5-yard touchdown run that cut New England’s lead to 10-6.  Now, with 10:06 left before the half, the Patriots faced a third-and-ten from their own 30.  One play away from giving the ball back to the aroused Pittsburgh offense, Patriot quarterback Tom Brady sat easily in his pocket (as the Steelers only sent three pass rushers after him), and found Julian Edelman all alone over the middle of Pittsburgh’s very soft zone for 12 yards and a first down.

Two plays later, New England was in third down again – third and eight – from its own 42.  Once again, Pittsburgh’s loose zone coverage left receiver Chris Hogan uncovered in the left flat.  He took Brady’s soft pass and raced down to the Steeler 34-yard line for a 22-yard gain.

Having had two chances to get off the field, Pittsburgh’s defense would not get a third.  On first-and-ten from the Pittsburgh 34, Brady handed the ball to running back Dion Lewis who ran with it almost to the line of scrimmage.  There he stopped and flipped the ball back to Brady, who finished the perfectly executed ‘flea-flicker’ with a touchdown toss to Hogan.  Now the Patriots led 17-6.

Back came the Steelers.  Two dump passes to DeAngelo Williams gained 18 yards and gave the Steelers a first down on their own 48.  Roethlisberger converted a third-and-two with a 12-yard pass to Antonio Brown, and followed that up with an 11-yard completion to tight end Jesse James.  First down at the Patriot 21.

On first down, Hamilton ran a streak up the left side and gained just a sliver of separation from Rowe, but Roethlisberger’s well-thrown back-shoulder pass bounced off Cobi’s chest.  This missed opportunity would soon be overshadowed by an even greater missed opportunity.  A 2-yard run by Williams brought Pittsburgh to third-and-eight from the New England 19-yard line at the two-minute warning.

Pittsburgh converted the third down as James beat safety Patrick Chung up the right sideline and Roethlisberger threw him the ball at about the 11-yard line with plenty of open space before him.  Converging on James as he reached the Patriot goal line were Chung and safety Duron Harmon.  Seemingly, they didn’t get there in time as James tumbled over the goal line.  The official’s arms raised.  The Pittsburgh sideline celebrated.  The points went on the scoreboard – it was now a 17-12 game with the Steelers contemplating a two-point try.

And then they checked the replay.

Harmon, somehow, had managed to drive James to the ground one-half yard away from the touchdown.  So it wasn’t 17-12 yet.  And, as it turned out, it never would be.

Two running plays lost four yards.  On the second running play, the Steelers had right guard DeCastro pulling – always dangerous on the goal line.  Patriot defensive lineman Vincent Valentine knifed through the void in the line and dumped Williams in the backfield.  Roethlisberger’s third-down throw to Eli Rogers was well wide, and the Steelers kicked the field goal.

Pittsburgh’s first four “red zone” plays netted 18 yards and a touchdown.  Pittsburgh’s fifth red zone play accounted for another 18 yards (the pass to James).  In Pittsburgh’s last seven red zone plays of the season, they netted just seven yards and missed two opportunities that would have changed the complexion of the game.

All in a day’s work for the New England defense.

New England’s Defense

In Foxborough, Massachusetts, everyone lives and works in Tom Brady’s shadow.  One of the most decorated quarterbacks in history, Brady has been the starter in New England for 15 full seasons, now.  Those teams have missed the playoffs only once, while Brady is less than twenty-four hours away from perhaps his fifth Super Bowl title.  He is the focus of the football universe.

But in 2016 – flying almost completely under the national radar – New England assembled an exceptional defensive unit that is as responsible as the offense for leading Patriots into the Super Bowl.  This defense will be one of the critical elements in their upcoming victory.  Unlike Atlanta or Green Bay there are no Vic Beasley’s or Clay Matthews’ or any name superstar.  No one from the Patriots was among the league leaders in sacks or interceptions.  Unlike the offense, there is no center of media attention.  Yet the Patriots (who during the season surrendered the fewest point of any defense in football) mostly dominated one of football’s best offenses (Pittsburgh came into the game ranked seventh in total yards and fifth in passing yards).  They did so in a manner that is wholly unique to the Patriots.  Instead of a collection of compelling talents, Bill Belichick and his staff has composed an army of specialists who simply do their job.

What defensive lineman Alan Branch does for a living is not remotely glamorous.  He is an unlikely candidate to appear on the cover of GQ magazine.  He doesn’t hold a fistful of records or gaudy sack totals.  It’s entirely doubtful that the cover of the next issue of Sports Illustrated will feature a glossy photo of Alan with his cleats dug into the Gillette Stadium turf fending off the charge of two enormous offensive linemen.  Yet that is how he spent most of the evening.

One week after the elite offensive line of the Steelers carved up the Kansas City Chiefs to the tune of 171 rushing yards, Pittsburgh was limited to just 54 in New England as Branch and his defensive line mates Trey Flowers, Malcom Brown and Jabaal Sheard relentlessly and unceremoniously hurled themselves at that offensive line.  Where as the week before, that line had repeatedly pushed the Kansas City defensive line back into its own secondary, this week nearly every Pittsburgh running play more closely resembled a rugby scrum where the line of scrimmage was littered with the bodies of fallen linemen, allowing the linebackers unfettered access to the ball carriers.

Behind the unyielding defensive line roams a linebacking corps that resembles a collection of Swiss army knives.  Rob Ninkovich, Shea McClellin, Kyle Van Noy, Dont’a Hightower and Elandon Roberts do a little bit of everything.  The rush the passer, they play tight pass coverage – especially in man schemes, and they tackle.  Oh yes, they tackle.  When the Patriot linebackers arrive on the scene, the progress of the ball carrier halts.  Over the years, the Patriots have earned the reputation as the most fundamentally sound team in football.  One needs look no further than this collection of linebackers to validate this reputation.

An honorary membership in this group needs to be extended to safety Patrick Chung.  Listed generously at 5-11 and 207 pounds, Chung doesn’t at all fit the physical profile of a linebacker.  But he is almost always within 7 or so yards of the line of scrimmage.  A lot of the defensive backs in the league will do what they can to let some of the bigger defenders stop the running games.  Patrick Chung lives to mix it up with the big boys.  Sometimes you will even see him lineup in between the big defensive linemen on the line of scrimmage.

The backbone of this impressive defense is a secondary that gets more impressive every time I watch them – especially cornerbacks Malcolm Butler, Logan Ryan and Eric Rowe.  Their efforts in man coverage against the very talented Pittsburgh receivers was more than a little stunning.

At the end of the day, Roethlisberger and his receiving crew ended up just 9 of 23 (39.1%) when throwing against New England when they were in man coverage.  Antonio Brown – one of football’s elite offensive talents – ended his night with just 7 catches for 77 yards.  For the season, Antonio caught 106 passes for 1284 yards.  His first two playoff games saw him collect 5 passes for 124 yards and 2 touchdowns against Miami, and 6 passes for 108 yards against Kansas City.

Against the New England man coverage scheme – which was basically Butler with safety help over top – Brown was only targeted 4 times.  He finished with 2 catches for 22 yards.

Let’s let that sink in a bit.  Four targets, two catches, twenty-two yards.  What was the unimaginably clever defensive scheme that the Patriots used to foil Pittsburgh’s most dangerous weapon?  Press man coverage from Butler with safety help over the top.  As defensive schemes go, this is hardly the theory of relativity.  What made it work was simple execution.  In the do-your-job universe of Bill Belichick, if your job is to cover Jones, then you cover Jones.  No other activity during the play will distract you from your job.  Patriot defensive backs do not get caught looking into the offensive backfield when they are in man coverage.  The expression of this philosophy is appallingly simple.  Its execution is something most teams consistently fail at.

Super Bowl Prediction

There is an assumption by many that the New England defense will be as helpless against Atlanta’s great wide receiver Julio Jones as every other defense has been.  I beg to differ.

As I play through the game in my mind, I see the Patriot offense probing the young Falcon defense until it settles on one of the weaknesses to exploit – it could be Atlanta’s issues in stopping the running game or its difficulty covering tight end Martellus Bennett in man coverage.  After the number that Brady did on the Steeler zone defenses, I doubt that we’ll see Atlanta play much zone against them.  They are not terribly good at zone defense, anyway.  Probably they will try to pressure Brady up the middle.  My guess is that we will see much more blitzing from Atlanta than we did from Pittsburgh.  The pressure will give the Falcons their best chance at slowing the Patriot offense.  But blitzing Brady comes with its own set of risks.  The Steelers only blitzed him six times and Brady was 6-for-6 for 117 yards and a touchdown when they did.

Anyway, it’s difficult to imagine that Atlanta will hold the Patriot offense to fewer than, say, 33 points.  This places the onus squarely on the Falcon offense to match the Patriots touchdown for touchdown.

When I reflect on how unimpressive Atlanta’s offensive line was against Green Bay and how dominant New England’s defensive line was against Pittsburgh’s much better offensive line, I have a hard time imagining that Atlanta will be able to establish any kind of running game.  This will force Matt Ryan to win the game through the air – throwing against this very skilled man coverage defense.

Will New England shut out the Patriots or eliminate Julio Jones entirely from the mix?  Almost assuredly not.  Ryan is an elite quarterback and Jones is probably the best wide receiver in football.

But will a one-dimensional Falcon offense (even if that one dimension is Ryan-to-Jones) be enough to win a point fest against the Patriots?  I’m going to have to say no.

After a season of turmoil, we are a few hours away now from its concluding game.  The Atlanta Falcons have grown up very quickly. They have now moved themselves into the upper echelon the NFL.  But – it says here – they are not yet a match for the Patriots.  But then again, who is?

The NFL Gamebook for the New England-Pittsburgh contest is here, and the Pro Football Reference Summary can be found here.

Could the Pittsburgh Running Game Send Them to the Super Bowl?

I’m sure it has happened, but off the top of my head I don’t ever remember seeing it.  In the Bill Belichick era, I don’t remember a team that has consistently run the ball at the New England defense all the way through the game.

This thought ran through my mind yesterday as I was re-watching the Pittsburgh Steelers relentless pounding of the Kansas City Chiefs.  By game’s end, the Steelers had called 34 running plays against 32 passing plays.  Although they never led the game by more than 8 points, 15 of their 24 second half plays were runs – 12 handoffs to Le’Veon Bell and 3 kneel-downs by Ben Roethlisberger.  Bell finished the evening with 170 rushing yards on 30 carries (a 5.7 yard average).

During the regular season, the Steelers featured the fifth-most prolific passing game in the NFL.  Their running game finished in the middle of the pack with a slightly above average 110 rushing yards per game (the league average was 108.9).  There is – as they demonstrated last Sunday night – nothing average about their running game.  While they mostly choose to attack through the air, they effortlessly switched to a ground-oriented game plan to take advantage of Kansas City’s pronounced weakness against the run – the Chiefs finished twenty-sixth out of thirty-two team in stopping the run as they allowed 121.1 rushing yards a game.

In fact, one of the characteristics of the Steelers’ current winning streak – which has now reached nine games – is an increased reliance on the running attack.  In their 4-5 start, Pittsburgh averaged 90.7 rushing yards per game.  During the winning streak, that number had improved to 143.8 yards-per-game.  Over these nine games alone, Bell has amassed 1,172 rushing yards (146.5 per game as Le’Veon has only played in 8 of the 9 games) averaging 5.3 per carry and scoring 8 rushing touchdowns.  Clearly, this is a team that has re-discovered its mojo.

As they prepare to focus that running prowess on the challenge that is the New England Patriots (and I believe that Pittsburgh is the last, best remaining chance to deny the Pats another ring) let’s take a few moments to recognize the interior of that stellar offensive line.

Drafted in the first round (the eighteenth player selected) of the 2010 draft, center Maurkice Pouncey is now the unquestioned leader of the offensive line.  He will be going to his fifth Pro Bowl in seven seasons (missing the 2013 and 2015 seasons when injuries kept him off the field for 31 of the 32 games).  He has twice been named First Team All-Pro.  Savvy, gritty and relentless, his toughness rubs off on the rest of the line.  Pouncey played very well last Sunday, but was overshadowed by the dominant play of the two guards.

Left guard Ramon Foster has never been named to the Pro Bowl and has been mostly unrecognized since Pittsburgh signed him as an undrafted free agent out of Tennessee before the 2009 season.  He spent most of Sunday evening looking across the line of scrimmage at Kansas City’s much-decorated defensive tackle Dontari Poe, who has already gone to two Pro Bowls since his first-round selection in 2012.  These matchups were won decisively by the undrafted Foster who enabled Le’Veon Bell’s night by repeatedly pushing Poe off the line of scrimmage.

And then, there is right guard David DeCastro.  Picked in the first round two years after Pouncey, DeCastro was the engine behind the Steeler running attack.  Le’Veon’s 30 rushes included 16 that went for four yards or more.  In 13 of those 16, Bell scooted through a whole personally cleared by DeCastro.  Whoever lined up against DeCastro or Foster that night spent the evening going backwards.  It was as impressive a performance as you are likely to see.

Of course, in New England they will face much greater opposition.  In fact, looking again at the KC defense, I see that it was handicapped from the beginning.

Many of Bell’s explosive runs came with Kansas City having only two defensive linemen on the field.  The Chiefs actually spent considerable time in a 2-3-6 alignment.  For about 90% of the game, Pittsburgh’s offensive tackles didn’t have a defensive lineman to oppose them.

Some of the rationale for these alignments – of course – was to inhibit the Pittsburgh passing game (which it sort of did as Roethlisberger finished with 224 yards passing).  They may have been equally motivated by roster necessity as a rash of injuries forced the Chiefs into a lot of patchwork among the front seven.  In fact, while the 2-3-6 alignment frequently included safety Daniel Sorensen, he played his 30 snaps as an inside linebacker.  Seeing Daniel weighs in at 6-2, 208 pounds he was little match for the talented Steeler offensive line.

So New England will be tougher.  How the Patriots will line up is one of the anticipated mysteries, but you can expect Belichick and his crew to come up will a compelling plan to slow down this passing game.  But could they withstand the Steeler running game for the whole sixty minutes?  It would take an uncommon commitment to the run, since it likely won’t meet with a whole lot of early success.  But if Coach Mike Tomlin did decide to turn this into a line-of-scrimmage game, how would the Patriots hold up?

I don’t know.  As I said, I don’t think I’ve ever seen it tried.

NFL Profiles as a Quarterback Driven League

And now, there are four left.  This Sunday, the Green Bay Packers will battle the Atlanta Falcons for supremacy in the NFC.  A few hours later, the Pittsburgh Steelers will oppose the New England Patriots for the AFC title.  If these are the final four teams standing – the only ones still eligible to claim the trophy – what does that tell us about the NFL in 2016?  What is the profile of the league?

You have heard many insiders state that the NFL is a quarterback driven league.  Nothing bears that out better than the composition of the final four teams.  All four teams are among the top ten scoring teams in the league, including three of the top four.  In order of points scored, they are Atlanta (first at 540), New England (third with 441), Green Bay (fourth with 432) and Pittsburgh (tenth at 399).

In terms of yardage, all four of these teams rank in the top eight in the NFL – Atlanta (2), New England (4), Pittsburgh (7), and Green Bay (8), and they have done so without overwhelming contributions from the running game.  Only two of the top ten running attacks are still in the mix – Atlanta (which ranked fifth with 120.5 yards a game) and New England (which finished seventh with 117 yards a game); while Green Bay finished twentieth running the ball at 106.3 yards per game.

The passing offenses ranked third (Atlanta behind Matt Ryan), fourth (New England and Tom Brady), fifth (Pittsburgh with Ben Roethlisberger), and seventh (Green Bay and Aaron Rodgers).

Interestingly, defense – which has long been perceived as necessary for winning championships – is under-represented in the final four.  Only one top ten defense – New England finished eighth – is still alive, while the NCF Championship Game will feature two of the poorest defenses (by yards allowed) in the NFL.  Green Bay finished twenty-second in overall defense, and Atlanta finished twenty-fifth.

Compellingly, none of these defenses has been bad at stopping the run.  Of the final four, Atlanta surrenders the most rush yardage at 104.5, which is still below the NFL average of 108.9.  Two other defenses ranked in the top ten against the run.  Green Bay – number 22 overall – finished eighth at stopping the run (94.7 yards per game) and New England finished third, allowing just 88.6 rushing yards per game.  There are no top ten pass defenses (by yards allowed) still playing, but the Falcons (#28) and Green Bay (#31) will square off in the early game.

As far as allowing points, the four finalists are evenly divided.  Two are top ten scoring defenses, and the other two finished in the bottom eleven.  The Patriots (as pointed out in an earlier post) are the NFL’s top scoring defense – allowing 250 points, and Pittsburgh gave up 327 points (good for tenth).  But 388 regular season points were scored against Green Bay (they ranked twenty-first), and 406 points scored against Atlanta (they ranked twenty-seventh).

To be clear about all of this, running the ball and playing good defense doesn’t diminish your chances.  Those are both great assets.  But the testimony of this season’s conference championships is that your competing franchise needs to have that franchise quarterback at its center.  The four that will suit up on Sunday (Rodgers, Ryan, Roethlisberger and Brady) all rank among the very best in the league.

If we accept this as gospel (and I admit that focusing on the final four for just one season may lead to a slanted conclusion), then where does that leave the other eight playoff teams that have already seen their seasons ended?  Do they have the man back there that can take them where they need to go?  Let’s first consider the teams that were bounced out in the Divisional Round:

The Seattle Seahawks (11-6-1, NFC West Champions)

Seattle was hammered pretty convincingly in Atlanta.  The culprits here were an under-performing offensive line (a year-long concern) and a defense that couldn’t compete with the Falcons’ offense without Earl Thomas in the secondary.  I don’t know anyone who isn’t convinced that their QB – Russell Wilson – doesn’t belong among the league’s top signal callers.  In his five seasons leading the Seahawks, he has fashioned a 56-23-1 record and led them to five straight playoff berths, two Super Bowl appearances and one World Championship.  His passer rating has been over 100 in three of those seasons, and for his career stands at 99.6.  But even beyond Wilson’s elite decision making and plus accuracy lie his off-the-chart leadership abilities.  Russell Wilson can quarterback for me any day.  They are in good hands.

Houston Texans (10-8, AFC South Division Champs)

What is there to say about Brock Osweiler?  Thinking back on it, the New England game was a kind of microcosm of his season.  There were some excellent moments – moments that showcased the talent that made him desirable to the Texans.  Brock takes an infectious energy with him onto the field.  Against the Patriots, he made a couple of clutch runs and – at times – threw bullet passes into small windows.  In one of the game’s pivotal moments, he dropped a perfect touchdown pass over the outstretched arms a defender and right into the arms of Will Fuller – who, of course, dropped it.  It’s hard to say how that game progresses if Fuller holds on to that pass.

At the same time, there was a lot of bad Brock on display as well.  Many ill-advised passes, many throws that were wildly inaccurate, many times that Brock played too fast.

Much of this could be just a young player going through his growing pains.  It’s possible that Osweiler may yet develop into the franchise QB that Houston hopes he is.  But for now, Brock has a lot of proving to do.  Houston will have to wait and see if they have their guy.

Kansas City Chiefs (12-5, AFC West Division Champs)

Again, the spotlight falls on Alex Smith.  The Pittsburgh Steelers (his opponents in the Divisional Round) have a good, but not great defense.  Last Sunday night, playing at home and with his defense holding the dynamic Steeler offense to just 18 points (all field goals), Alex finished his evening just 20 of 34 for just 172 yards.  He threw for one touchdown and one interception.  This year he even had more offensive weapons – especially receivers – than he has had in any of his previous seasons in Kansas City.

Yes, he came one two-point conversion short of tying the game, but even at that, KC would have only finished with 18 points.  However you slice it, it was another opportunity for Alex Smith to show that world that he could rise to the moment in the bright lights of the NFL playoffs.  It was another opportunity that passed him by.  As the season’s roll on, I am more and more of the opinion that Smith is not that franchise quarterback.

Dallas Cowboys (13-4, NFC East Division Champs)

Even in a losing effort, the Cowboys’ ability to come from 18 points behind to tie the game twice in the fourth quarter was one of the most impressive efforts I’ve seen in the NFL in a long time.  Everything I’ve seen from rookie Dak Prescott indicates that he is the real deal.  He stood toe-to-toe with Aaron Rodgers and very nearly sent his team into the conference championship.  My gut feeling is that Dallas has their man.

And the WildCard losers?

Oakland Raiders (12-5)

The Raiders, of course, were down to their third-string QB when they opened the playoffs with a loss in Houston.  I would have loved to see Derek Carr have his first opportunity in the playoffs.  Carr looks like the future in Oakland (or wherever the Raiders end up).  The Raiders look like they’ve got a good one.

Detroit Lions (9-8)

Matthew Stafford isn’t a quarterback that I’ve been overly impressed with in past years, but my opinion may be changing.  As a younger QB, he seemed a little soft.  He was a guy that I wouldn’t have trusted to lead my team from behind in the fourth quarter of a tough game.

Of course, over the last three seasons, Matthew has made that into a kind of specialty.  Stafford has led the Lions to 27 regular season wins over the last three years, with 16 of them coming on fourth-quarter scoring drives.  Matthew has grown up a lot in the last few years.

Is he a franchise quarterback?  Maybe.  His one-game appearance in this year’s playoffs was not – I don’t think – an accurate reflection of his abilities.  He was – as everyone knows – playing with a splint on the middle finger of his throwing hand.  Matthew downplayed it, but there is no question the injury seriously affected his accuracy.  Stafford has suffered through some lean years in Detroit.  He deserves the chance to show his city (and the NFL) that he can be an elite QB.

Miami Dolphins (10-7)

Even though backup QB Matt Moore performed more than admirably in the playoff loss to Pittsburgh, Miami may be the team most damaged by not having its starting quarterback available for the playoffs.  I’m not suggesting that Ryan Tannehill would have led them to victory, or would have them playing this Sunday.  But of all the teams in this year’s playoffs, Miami is the only one that has never seen their quarterback play in a big game.

With Miami mostly a non-factor during Tannehill’s first four seasons, Ryan never really had an opportunity to play in any kind of important game.  After the Dolphins lost four of their first five games this season, it looked like 2016 was going to be a replay of his previous seasons.

Tannehill then brought them into playoff consideration by taking his team on a 6-game winning streak.  That was certainly encouraging, but not quite defining as almost all of those games were played against teams that struggled – to some degree or other.  The best of those wins was the first one against Pittsburgh.  At that point Miami was still 1-4 and still hadn’t taken the wraps off running back Jay Ajayi.  It’s easy to think that Pittsburgh – which hadn’t really found itself yet – was caught by surprise.

The other wins: they won by three points at home against Buffalo (finished the season 7-9); they won by four at home against the NY Jets (5-11); they won by seven in San Diego (5-11); they beat the Rams (4-12) in LA by four points; and they beat San Francisco (2-14) at home by seven.

Hardly the Murderers Row of the NFL.

So, is Ryan Tannehill that franchise quarterback?  I don’t know.  And neither, really, do the Dolphins.  Until he plays in at least one playoff game, there isn’t any way to know.

New York Giants (11-6)

Some day we will have to have the Eli Manning discussion.  There isn’t time for that today.  Yes, I know he has two rings – more than the combined total of the two QBs who will be playing for the NFC title.  But he is still – in my mind – one of football’s most over-rated quarterbacks.

Again – a discussion for another time.  But if I’m the Giants, I would have my eye out for the guy who will eventually take the reins from Eli.